Forest Moon Farms in Liberty

Wonderful Opportunity to Own an Income Producing Organic Produce Working Farm in Liberty! Live the North Carolina Dream on this Beautiful 16 +/- Acre Property! Large Stone Fireplace in Cabin Style Home w/ 2 Beds & 2 Baths. Fully Functional Produce Facility w/ Growing Tunnel, Barns, Sheds, Irrigation and More! Open Pasture for Horses or Cattle with 5 Stall Barn. Expand with Another Home Overlooking the Lake. Mini-House Conveys with Monthly Income and Consistent Bookings. $494,000, 7792 Hornady Trail in Liberty 

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Wake Forest 10 acres

9.6 Acre Mini Farm in Wake Forest

(UNDER CONTRACT)! One of the Prettiest Mini Farms in Wake Forest! Beautiful Open Pasture in a Rural Setting yet Close to Wake Forest and Raleigh. Perfect for a Dream Home with Horses and Animals. Rolling Topography with Outstanding Views from Every Angle. Old Oaks Outline the Perfect Home site. Close to Falls Lake! $250,000

Do not drive vehicles across pasture. Property is being farmed for hay. Park on road and feel free to walk. Acreage has general flags on borders. Call agents for details!

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Equestrian Farm Legal Issues

Equestrian Farm Legal Issues NCNorth Carolina, a state that is still largely rural with one of the most temperate climates in the nation – we enjoy over 200 days of sunshine per year and average statewide temperatures of a comfortable 56-70 degrees – is an ideal location for anyone seeking to purchase their own horse farm. The process of buying an equestrian property, however, differs substantially from that of buying traditional farmland. In order to avoid the possible emotional and financial toll of dealing with legal issues connected to a property after its purchase, doing your homework beforehand and selecting a realtor with as much experience as possible in this area are key to a successful transaction.

Zoning & Covenants

Zoning ordinances, or regulations on the use of land and buildings within a certain geographical area, are designed to protect the public’s health and welfare. By ensuring that property owners adhere to a set of rules mandated by law, zoning restrictions help maintain property values and may also prevent future conflicts between neighbors. In an area of equestrian farms, zoning ordinances might regulate any number of things: whether the property may be used for commercial purposes (training or boarding, for instance); the number of horses allowed per acre; the suitability of the property for spreading manure; how far back fencing and barns must be placed from property lines; and many more important guidelines.

Issues sometimes arise when A) new zoning is proposed by authorities, or B) when property is re-zoned for commercial or residential use, or even C) when one property owner performs some activity on his own lands that might adversely affect his neighbors. When a land owner knowingly exceeds zoning regulations, what comes next, typically, is an appeals process through whatever local body governs that area. This process may be drawn out and costly, involving public hearings, the hiring of legal or other professional advisors, and, perhaps most importantly, garnering the support of neighbors and other locals. Sadly, an appeals process may sometimes even result in failure. In this case, the property owner will have to be satisfied with that outcome and continue to live in the midst of some of the very same neighbors who might NOT have been so supportive of him throughout the appeal.  

CCRs (Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions) are regulations placed by a developer over and above any zoning laws that affect that property. A covenant may restrict the size or number of buildings that might be constructed, or it may apply to the size and/or placement of a residence. Although some new property owners may be put off by the idea of rules that guide – and restrict – their activities, the purpose of a set of CCRs is to ensure that standards are put in place that will protect ALL property owners and property values in the region, including their own. Covenants on farms in remote settings are likely to be less restrictive than those closer to more urban areas, as they often apply to larger properties with fewer neighbors. The risk of purchasing a property with few or no covenants, of course, is that neighboring properties are also likely to have that same freedom of being able to “do what they want,” whether this is collecting old junk vehicles, allowing decrepit, unsightly old buildings to fall into even worse disrepair, making an unreasonable amount of noise, or doing anything else that might be considered unacceptable.

The importance of having a realtor who is well versed in zoning law and the restrictions that apply in a certain area cannot be overstated. It’s no fun for a potential buyer or a new property owner to find out that certain restrictions exist affecting their future plans or activities. This situation can be avoided, of course, with the guidance of a real estate professional with expert knowledge in buying and selling equestrian properties.

The Importance of a Proper – and Current – Survey

Equestrian Farm Legal IssuesIf a survey doesn’t already exist, it is imperative – unless your legal advisor suggests otherwise – that a survey be taken. Oftentimes, especially if a property has been in the same owner’s or family’s hands for years, or even decades, a survey might NEVER have been done; yet imagine the frustration of purchasing a property without a current survey, then having to deal with the nightmare of a property line conflict or an electric company putting up power lines across a field (taking advantage of a utilities easement) down the road.

Ninety-nine times out of a hundred, a lender will require a survey to determine the exact boundaries and features of the land, and to ensure that the loan amount doesn’t exceed the actual value of the property. Besides property lines and easements (when the right to access a certain portion of a piece of property lies with some other entity), a survey will show flood plains and land elevation as well as where future fencing or other improvements – like driveways – might be added, according to local zoning restrictions. The fee paid for a survey is usually included in the buyer’s closing costs, yet it is well worth it; he will almost certainly need this survey if a new home or other buildings are a part of his future plans.

For tips on North Carolina Land Sales, NC Land and Farms for Sale in Central North Carolina, NC Farms and Land for Sale, or Financing for NC Land, please contact the professionals at Legacy Farms and Ranches of North Carolina.

 


North Carolina Hops and Growing Hops

Beer, Brewing and Bines: It’s All About the Hops!

North Carolina HopsAsk anyone what they know about hops, and most likely they’ll be able to tell you that hops have SOMETHING to do with the taste and aroma of some of their favorite beers, but they might not be able to identify a field of hops or understand how hops are used in the brewing process. Hop production is expanding rapidly throughout the U.S., and an interest in hop farming in North Carolina is growing, too, as our state has one of the fastest-growing craft beer industries in the nation.

A History of Hops in the U.S. and North Carolina

Hops were first imported by European immigrants in the early 1600s. Because beer was such an important part of the early American diet, hop growing quickly spread up and down the East Coast. As a result of aphid infestations in the Northeast late in the 19th century, production expanded into other parts of the country, including what is today the nation’s primary hop-growing region: Oregon, Washington, Idaho and California. Over the past 80 years, both USDA and private hop breeding programs have developed in the Northwest and elsewhere, including in North Carolina, where this industry is just starting to take off in the mountain region.  

Hops’ Starring Role in the Brewing Process

“Bittering hops” added at the start of the brewing process balance out the sweetness of the malt by increasing the acid level of the mixture. This acidity is brought about through the process of boiling the fragrant flowers of the female hop plant and adding the resins and oils from the flowers into the brew. Hops added toward the end tend to have a lower level of acid, which flavors the brew and adds the very distinctive “hoppy” aroma that so many beer aficionados crave.

Hop Farming, Facts and Varieties

The vast majority of hop production takes place in the Pacific Northwest; just 4%, according to the USA Hops organization, occurs in other states, including North Carolina. On commercial farms in the Northwest, one acre of mature plants yields around 2,000 pounds, or 10 bales, of dried hop cones, and one of these bales yields anywhere from 135 to 800 barrels of beer. Outside the NW region, smaller farms supply local craft brewers, but hop growing is still a small crop in economic terms. Hops thrive in a sunny climate and are best grown in geographical locations – between 35 and 55 degrees latitude – with long days and cooler than average winters.

There are around 80 small hop farms in North Carolina, just a handful of which are able to supply enough hops for any large-batch brewing. Most NC hops are sold to smaller-scale brewers who still pick them by hand, but this demand is high, and hop prices, as a result, are climbing quickly. As hop demand increases, so does the process of experimentation and development that will eventually, no doubt, mean even greater expansion of hop production in our state.

Hops have several unique features, including the fact that they grow on bines, not vines (a bine twists around something, and always in a clockwise direction, whereas a vine grows in tendrils, in various directions), and up to 12” a day! Only the female plant is able to produce the actual hop “cones.”

Among the many varieties of hops grown in America – over seventy-five – three of these are grown most successfully in our state.

  • Chinook. This hop, with a high level of acid and a heavy aroma, is most commonly used in the production of stouts, porters, barley wine and bitter lagers.
  • The Nugget variety also has a high acid content and an herbal, spicy bitterness. It is used in the brewing of pale ales, IPAs, porters, stouts and lagers.
  • Cascade. This variety is an aroma hop, which can be described as flowery and citrusy and is most commonly used in the production of pale ales, barley wines, porters and witbier, which is a pale ale with a high wheat content.

Hops’ Healthy Benefits

Hop Growers in North CarolinaAccording to certain specialists in alternative medicine, some of the essential oils and flavonoids found in the plant’s buds have anti-inflammatory, anti-anxiety, and pain-relieving abilities; researchers have also shown that they are effective at fighting insomnia, cardiovascular disease and depression. Some more controversial studies even indicate that hops – more specifically, the compound xanthohumol – may have cancer-fighting properties.  

Agritourism: The Hops Farm Tour

If you’ve ever had your own yen to grow hops or just have a curiosity about how a hop farm functions, check out the Farm Boy Farms’ Hop Farming Tour, in Pittsboro. Owner Dan Gridley’s interest in beer brewing compelled him to start growing hops (in additional to barley, wheat and rye), supplying local microbreweries and sharing his knowledge with the community in the form of immersive and interactive farm tours, which vary by season.

2021 Hop Festivals

Several annual beer events take place around the state, but two of the most notable festivals celebrating the thriving craft brewing industry – both of which were on hiatus in 2020 due to Covid – are scheduled for fall of 2021.

The Hops & Hogs Fest, happening Saturday and Sunday September 4th and 5th at Charlotte’s Park Expo Center, celebrates that perfect festival combination of beer, barbecue, and music and will feature a “craft corral lineup” of outstanding breweries, including Asheville’s own Bhramari Brewing Co. and Huntersville’s award-winning D9 Brewing.

A specific date has not yet been scheduled for Hickory, NC’s Hickory Hops Craft Beer & Music Festival, but the annual September event will feature the product of several local craft breweries and a full schedule of music. North Carolina Hops and Growing Hops

 

For tips on North Carolina Land Sales, NC Land and Farms for Sale in Central North Carolina, NC Farms and Land for Sale, or Financing for NC Land, please contact the professionals at Legacy Farms and Ranches of North Carolina.

 


Waterfall on General Green Road

206 Acres on General Green Road in Franklin County

$4000 per acre! 206 Acres off of General Green Road in Kittrell offers the Best of a Recreational Tract with a Solid Timber Investment! One of the Prettiest and Diverse Properties in Franklin County! Waterfalls, Topography, Timber, Road Systems, Trails, Pond, Duck Swamp, Timber and More! Well Managed Merchantable Pine Stands (30-34+ years in age) with High Value. Hardwood Ridges and Valleys Abound with Multiple Flowing Creeks and Scenic Views. Trails Lead to Wildlife Areas with Tons of Deer and Turkey. Unique Swamp Area with Lots of Wood Ducks and Geese.

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Big Changes in Store for the 2021 NC Striper Fishing Season

Big Changes in Store for the 2021 NC Striper Fishing Season

As warm weather and longer days slowly but thankfully return, it’s time to look forward to springtime striped bass – or ‘striper’ – harvest season on the Roanoke River, and a few critical changes that are bound to affect your 2021 fishing plans.  

The History of Striped Bass on the Roanoke

2021 NC Striper Fishing SeasonThe striped bass, a silver-white fish with several distinctive horizontal stripes along its sides and an adult size of up to 3 feet and 20 pounds, is one of North Carolina’s most common fish species, and one of the most popular game and food fishes in the United States. North Carolina’s population of stripers is among the largest on the East Coast. One of the most unique features of the striped bass is the fact that it is an anadromous fish, or one that lives in saltwater – the Albemarle Sound – for most of its life but returns to its birthing location in the Roanoke River to spawn.

The striper was so popular as a game fish in the Albemarle Sound in the past – once growing up to 5-6 feet in length and weighing as much as 125 pounds – that between the 1890s and 1940s its numbers plummeted. In the mid-1900s, two additional things happened to threaten the species; commercial fishing expanded very quickly, and water quality in North Carolina’s coastal regions suffered from rapid expansions of agriculture, industry, and urban development. As a result, by the 1960s the populations of striped bass had dwindled considerably. It wasn’t until the 1970s that stricter controls on harvesting the fish were implemented on North Carolina’s rivers and the Albemarle Sound, and in 1997, the Roanoke River / Albemarle Sound habitat was officially declared ‘restored’ in terms of the population of striped bass. Today, the striper can be found on the Tar-Pamlico, Cape Fear, Neuse and White Oak rivers and in reservoirs including Lake Gaston, Jordan Lake and Lake Norman, but the primary spawning river for striped bass in our state is the Roanoke. Each year surveys on spawning and harvesting conducted by the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission are implemented to ensure that the population of striped bass remains at a good and sustainable level.  

The Spawning Process

In the springtime, once waters reach a temperature of between 62 and 70 degrees – generally speaking, in March – adult stripers make their way from the Albemarle Sound to the mouth of the inlet near Plymouth, and then up the Roanoke for about 130 miles to the Weldon, NC area, where they were born. Here, female stripers release up to two million eggs within one spawning season, and males fertilize them. Once the eggs are fertilized, they float in the water for 2-3 days, hatch, and are finally carried by the current back down the river to the lower Roanoke and parts of the Albemarle Sound; incredibly, less than 1% of these striper hatchlings survive this journey. For up to four years, these young fish live and grow in the Sound, but eventually, once sexually mature – the males at around 2 years of age, the females at 3-4 years old – they make their way back up the Roanoke to spawn on their own, a cycle they’ll repeat for up to 20 years.

An Abbreviated 2021 Fishing Season

Because of a recent drop in the striper population due to over-fishing, the number of young, baby striped bass has also decreased. North Carolina’s Fisheries Reform Act of 1997 requires that when over-fishing is occurring, certain steps must be taken to reverse that trend over a 2-year period of time, and the population must be entirely recovered with ten years. A Stock Assessment Model used by the NCWRC has also determined that spawning has been affected by flooding in the Upper Roanoke over several recent springtime fishing seasons, which has greatly reduced the number of eggs that are able to be transported down the Roanoke and into the Albemarle Sound.

The Stock Assessment Model also calculates the maximum number of stripers that may be caught each year – the quota – in order to maintain a sustainable population of the fish. For 2021, this quota has been set at just 51,200 pounds. 50% of this figure will be applied to the Albemarle Sound commercial fishery, and the remaining 50% split between recreational fishing in the Sound and fishing in the Roanoke River Management Area. From last year to this, the Roanoke River limit has dropped from 68,750 to just 12,800 pounds.

The 2021 harvest season in the Roanoke River Management Area will now take place over just two weeks in April, and in two separate sections of the river – Lower and Upper – so that anglers with preferences in one area or the other will have a time to fish. Weeks selected for each of these areas were based on data collected over the past nine seasons.

  • Harvest Season –
    • Lower River Zone (downstream of the U.S. Highway 258 bridge at Scotland Neck to the Albemarle Sound): April 10-16.
    • Upper River Zone (upstream of the U.S. Highway 258 bridge): April 24-30.
  • Size limits remain the same for 2021 – a minimum of 18 inches per fish, and NO fish between 22 and 27 inches (a measurement designed to protect spawning females 5-8 years old) are permitted. Creel limits of two fish also remain unchanged. Only ONE of these two fish is allowed to be over 27 inches in length.

Catch-and-Release Fishing

Catch-and-release fishing, allowed between April 1 and June 30, allows anglers to enjoy fishing while keeping the number of harvested fish at a reasonable level. However, at least six fish out of every 100 caught and released dies on average, and when the water temperature approaches 70 degrees, the mortality rate jumps to almost 25%. The NCWRC also takes this information into consideration when calculating the fishing quota. Keep in mind these tips when catching and successfully releasing your striped bass.

  • Reduce mortality by sticking to single, barbless hooks while fishing on the Upper River.
  • Avoid deep hooking by using artificial lures instead of live bait and remove hooks carefully by using a de-hooker or a pair of needle nose pliers.
  • Minimize stress for the fish by using good tackle and landing the fish quickly.
  • Spend a minimal amount of time handling the fish and keep the fish in water.
  • Only use knotless or rubber landing nets, and even then, ONLY if absolutely necessary.

 

For tips on North Carolina Land Sales, NC Land and Farms for Sale in Central North Carolina, NC Farms and Land for Sale, or Financing for NC Land, please contact the professionals at Legacy Farms and Ranches of North Carolina.


Franklin County Creek property

220 Acres on Rocky Ford Road near Ingleside and Hwy 401 in Franklin County NC

 220 Acres – This beautiful pine plantation is located on Rocky Ford Road near Ingleside and Hwy 401 in Franklin County, approximately 5 miles north of Louisburg. It has paved road frontage, good roads and a very nice stand of merchantable timber. The additional hunting and recreation appeal make this tract a great investment! There is a nice camp area and established food plots and small pond. Some pines are approaching 27-30 years of age. Timber is ready for harvest in many areas. Price per acre is $4500. Contact Frank Gombatz at 919-785-4249 or Gardner Reynolds 919-749-3177 for maps and other information.

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6021 Yancey Drive in Wendell Land under contract then sold

6021 Yancey Drive in Wendell on 32 Acres

(SOLD) $329,500 Handyman’s Dream! 2 Bedroom/1 Bath Ready for your Repairs! This Farm House is Framed by Towering Oaks and Nestled among 32+/- Acres. Lots of Work to be Done Here. Home has Large Kitchen, Family Room with Masonry Fireplace, 1st Floor Bedrooms and Office/ Bonus Room. Very Nice Wooded Property with Old Barns, Outbuildings and your own Private Pond. Great Investment Potential. Property and Home Sold in “AS IS” Condition. $329,500
 

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Eco-Friendly, Low-Maintenance Solar Power Fencing

 Solar Power Fencing for NC Farms?

Whether you’re looking to replace or update current fencing or installing new fencing on your farm, you’ll have a range of products and materials available to you, depending on budget, property type and other specific needs. If your goal, however, is to keep livestock or horses safe and in place, solar farm fencing might be the best option for you.

How Solar-Powered Fencing Works

 Solar Power Fencing for NC FarmsThe use of solar fencing has grown over the years along with an increase in environmental sustainability, clean, low-carbon footprint energy, and eco-friendly farm living.

Solar-powered fencing functions much as traditional electric fencing works, and yet it’s unique in that energy absorbed from the sun via solar panels generates direct current, or DC, which powers the system’s battery. Output from this battery flows through an energizer, or charger, producing a certain voltage that is emitted in pulses of energy passing through the wires. Because the pulsating energy only lasts around 3 milliseconds at a time every 1 to 1.5 seconds, the chance of a person or an animal being injured should they come into contact with this type of fencing is extremely low. A voltage alarm system allows the owner to monitor power and sounds an alarm when power is cut, shorted, or grounded. Solar fencing is also frequently used at parks, zoos, schools, and hospitals and often in people’s homes.

Other Types of Fencing and the Pros and Cons of Each

In North Carolina, if you own livestock you are required to install permanent fencing. There are a variety of alternative fence types, of course, that may just as easily fulfill your needs, each with its own set of benefits and drawbacks.

  • The most common, most time-proven material used for fencing is wood; low-tech and comparably low-cost, it is a very basic, effective means of keeping your animals penned in. Maintenance costs – painting, weatherproofing and repair – build up as years pass; however. It is still a widely used material for smaller areas like paddocks or handling facilities. Generally speaking, it is not ideal for perimeter fencing unless for decorative purposes or to simply mark a boundary.
  • Beautiful synthetic or PVC fencing is initially costly, both in terms of the product itself and installation, but it is hardier, lower-maintenance and more flexible than wood fencing and is guaranteed not to rot, rust, splinter or discolor over time. The drawback, of course, is the price tag; it is not often used on large pieces of land for this reason.
  • Barbed wire fencing, which is constructed with two intertwined strands of wire with sharp barbs that are attached to metal or wood posts, is strong and more effective at keeping animals in that other types of fencing. It also tends to carry a lower cost, which is more economical for fencing in large spaces. The major downside to using barbed wire is, naturally, the damage it might do to animals who get entangled in it, or to the humans who install and maintain it. In many states – though not in North Carolina – barbed wire fencing is illegal.
  • Woven or welded wire fencing, designed in a pattern of vertical and horizontal rows of wire woven together to create a sort of grid effect, is ideal for confining smaller animals or protecting garden areas or other more confined spaces. Chicken wire is a typical example of woven wire fencing.

Solar vs. Electric 

Either solar-powered or electric fencing is ideal if you’ve got large animals you’re trying to contain, or predators you’re trying to keep out. Durable and long-lasting, it consists of insulated wires running horizontally between vertical posts.

Besides a power outlet, electric fencing requires some sort of charger, or energizer, that sends energy through the wires; when an animal touches the wire, an extra impulse of energy is emitted which shocks the animal and tells that animal where the boundary is. Grounding rods, which are used to dissipate the charge from lighting or other sources of electricity into the earth, are also required, as is an insulator, which helps the system prevent a loss of voltage. It is difficult to move electric fencing from one location to another due to the power outlet requirement, but overall it is an excellent, economical and low-maintenance option.  

The benefits of using clean, reliable solar fencing over electric fencing is primarily the fact that NO electrical outlet will ever be needed; this type of off-the-grid farming is highly desirable for many farmers who either don’t have electric power sources, or don’t wish to be dependent on them. Other very valid reasons for considering solar-powered over electric fencing are these:

  • There is little to no risk of serious injury or even death in connection with accidents involving solar-powered fencing.
  • Solar fencing is easy to pick up and shift from one location to the other, for grazing or other purposes.
  • Beyond the initial cost to install, ongoing costs to maintain solar fencing are very low since power produced by the sun is absolutely free!
  • Solar fencing is easy to install and maintain.
  • Solar power isn’t vulnerable to power outages or other electrical issues.

Drawbacks of using solar power vs. electric include a dependency on good weather – you’ll need enough sunny hours each day to keep the system running at its most efficient levels – as well as the human energy required to keep solar panels clean and free from snow and other debris. This is especially important as the charger must be able to create energy even on days when there is relatively little sun or hours of daylight. Eco-Friendly, Low-Maintenance Solar Power Fencing

North Carolina Vendors and Suppliers

Carolina Solar Sources

2544 Durham-Chapel Hill Blvd.

Durham, NC 27707

(919) 808-5285

http://carolinasolar.services/

Tractor Supply Co.

3004 South Horner Blvd.
Sanford, NC 27332

(919) 708-9057

https://www.tractorsupply.com/

Agri-Supply

409 US Hwy 70 East

Garner, NC 27529

(919) 772-0865

https://www.agrisupply.com/

For tips on North Carolina Land Sales, NC Land and Farms for Sale in Central North Carolina, NC Farms and Land for Sale, or Financing for NC Land, please contact the professionals at Legacy Farms and Ranches of North Carolina.